Posts Tagged ‘market’

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry (6)

 

Equally important is a country’s managerial culture, which may or may not be well suited to the fast-changing, highly competitive computer industry. A country will ultimately succeed in computers to the extent that its domestic companies succeed or it is able to attract investment from successful foreign multinationals. Path Dependencies. This refers to the development […]

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry (5)

 

Our approach explains differences in industrial performance between companies and countries primarily in terms of: The Structure of the Global Computer Production System. Both the structure and the evolution of that system are important. This includes competition, alliances, and market transactions among companies at different levels of the production chain, from silicon to systems to […]

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry (4)

 

How, then, do we reconcile these two apparently different points of view? The answer lies not in ideological arguments over free markets versus government planning. Rather, it lies in the details. Industrial policies have been effective in the computer industry when they move in concert with market forces, and when they are aimed at developing […]

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry (3)

 

Our view is that both market and plan perspectives offer important insights into the success of the East Asian countries in computers, but neither is sufficient. Much of the East Asian success has been the result of the actions of companies and entrepreneurs acting in a highly competitive environment with limited government intervention.

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry (2)

 

In the neoclassical view, a country’s success in a particular industry such as computers results from the actions of the private sector—companies—rather than from the targeted industrial policy of governments.

Plan versus Market Explanations in Computer Industry

 

In comparing the different strategies of these countries in developing their computer industries, we seek to shed light on a central question in development economics: how can companies and countries establish and maintain a viable competitive position in a highly globalized, technologically dynamic industry?

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