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Website Accessibility and CSS

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The accessibility of your site involves more than just considering the users of screen readers. The design choices you make will impact users with a range of issues; for example, older people with poor eyesight, people with dyslexia, and those who are unable to use a mouse because of a physical disability.

These users will most likely be viewing your site as designed in a regular web browser, and so your choices when designing and building the site will impact on their experience. This is more a short checklist—rather than a hard and fast solution:

Set Background Colors When Using Background Images

If you’ve used a background image in your design underneath some text—perhaps giving a background color to a column or box—make sure that you also add a background color. That way, if the image fails to load, the color will ensure that the text on top remains at a high enough contrast to be read.

If You Set a Foreground Color, You Need to Set a Background Color, and Vice Versa

In the interests of readability, color settings should always be considered in tandem: that is, the foreground and background colors should be chosen together so that they contrast sufficiently. If you were to only set one color, say the background, and a user’s default foreground color lacks contrast with your choice of color, it may leave your text unreadable.

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